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Note: This blog expresses only the opinions of the blog owner,
and does not represent the opinion of any organization or blog
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Flying to Hollywood

It’s kind of a slow news day, so let’s talk about a bit of everything, including, yes, Hollywood.

- Aaron Eckhart, or sometimes the guy who plays the villain you love to hate, is joining the “Batman Begins” sequel “The Dark Knight,” playing Harvey Dent, or Two-Face (played by Tommy Lee Jones in Batman Forever, if I’m not mistaken). This is following Heath Ledger’s casting as The Joker, and of course, Christian Bale will return as Batman himself. The kick-ass Christopher Nolan also returns as director/co-screenwriter.

Source: Variety

- Eiga Consultant is predicting the winners of the major awards at the Japan Academy Awards this Saturday. An analysis of it and an English translation by Hoga Central is here. Personally, I think this is pretty spot-on, even though I would’ve predicted Yoji Yamada’s “Love and Honor” as winner of best picture. But then again, since Hula Girls did get chosen as Japan’s representative for the Academy Awards, the committee isn’t about to piss off that other committee by choosing any other movie.

And looking at the past history of the awards, I think the committee is too conservative to hand a best director award to “Memories of Matsuko” director Tetsuya Nakashima. I think the bigger chance goes to, of course, Yoji Yamada, whose “Twilight Samurai” swept the awards while “The Hidden Blade” didn’t. The frequency of one single film being able to sweep the awards should say something about how conservative the committee can be.

The nominees list (in Japanese) is here.

- Reviews time:

Variety posted their first review of the highly-anticipated 300. Funnier, though, is how New York Post critic Lou Lumenick links to it here.

Lumenick also links a review of the critic-proof blockbuster Ghost Rider here.

- Remember when Korean films like “A Moment to Remember” and “April Snow” scored big in Japan? “April Snow” even made more money in Japan than in its native South Korea (arigato, Yon-sama). Well, that magic’s gone away, and it went away quickly. Now CJ Entertainment is just lucky to be able to sell Park Chan-Wook’s “I’m a Cyborg, but That’s OK” to Japan. In fact, sales of Korean films to Japan has dropped by an astonishing 70%. That’s so sad that there’s no punchline to follow that up with.

Source: Variety Asia

- Finally, two humorous notes that has nothing to do with entertainment. Well, one of them kind of does.

People who’s read my review of Eason Chan’s album “What’s Going On…?” knows that I’m a huge fan of track 6 “Better Not to Meet.” Well, here’s a bittersweet version of it on youtube that laments the strengthening of the Chinese Renminbi against the Hong Kong dollar (it’s quite a serious issue in Hong Kong now. Back then, 100 Hong Kong dollars meant 140 renminbi. But now, it’s 100 Hong Kong dollar for roughly 99 renminbi.). It’s amusing and sad at the same time, really. (warning, in Chinese only)

Lastly, An anchorwoman in Hong Kong wrote a column about what true love to her means. Here is the translation. Here, however, is the original post in Chinese from a blog, where people criticize the columnist as a “typical Hong Kong woman” who expects men to give them everything. I think the best part of the post is the suggestion by the blogger, who says that if he encountered a girlfriend like that, he would follow up such “touching” words with “if my businesses fail and I would go bankrupt and crippled, would you give me back all those income that I’ve given you?”

True love? or selfishness?

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